Travel lighter

I am looking for ways to reduce what I carry around for work. Currently I haul around: 

  • MBP 13" + charger and connectors
  • Journal and lots of pens/styluses
  • Notebook
  • Battery for charging mobile + cables
  • Business cards
  • Pain killers and allergy medicine
  • USB pens
  • Small first-aid kit

So what do I really need to carry around. It seems my bag is getting heavier by the day. Maybe it is time for getting a smaller bag.

For daily use in the office & meetings I need: 

  • Computer & charger & connectors (network, dvi vga?)
  • Journal, Pens and styluses
  • Business cards (Not all...)
  • Power bank for charging mobile. (Maybe a smaller one?)  + cables
  • Pain killers and allergy medicine
  • Notebook
  • Room for some papers
  • Bags for organizing

For day travels I need in addition to this: 

  • Bose QC for flights
  • Shoe brush
  • Travel documents
  • Passport? 
  • Books / Kindle
  • iPad + charger cable? 
  • Photo camera

Decided to try out: GuardIT Bailhandle 33.8cm/13.3inch Black for the daily haul.

 

Task management using paper and pen

I've tried different sorts of computer programs and apps for managing time and tasks. It never worked out for me, so it is time to focus more on the old proven method using pen and paper. There seems to be many types of system people use, so let's start digging.

I have briefly ben using paper for task management, it is really relaxing to just have a paper in your pocket. You get a wonderful feeling once you can check of one of the tasks. 

The system I used previously is a plain paper, folded halfway in each direction. This gives you four quadrants. 

  1. Top left: priority tasks for today
  2. Top right: Tasks to be done at a later stage
  3. Bottom left: Calls to be made, emails to be sent, 
  4. Bottom right: Used for notes

This was for the daily plan. 

Example for daily task

Example for daily task

For the task overview, we used a weekly planner. There was a place for tasks, which were numbered sequentially. If we had to transfer the tasks to later weeks, we just referenced it, we did not move it to the new week. The referencing system was week # and sequence #. E.g. 38/4. Once a task was done we striked it out. We also estimated how long time a task should take, and also jotted down how long it really took.

The weekly planner was the master for all appointments.  Today, it is probably easier to use a calandering system on the computer, as you can subscribe to many calendars (work, private, activities as football, music bands,,,,,) and get the total overview over your use of time.

I seem to be missing a paper based system for planning a week. Maybe it is better to use the calendar on my computer, so others see that I am busy? Or should I use Evernote for archiving and referencing of old tasks? Need to test how it works out, I guess.  Alternatively, use something like: Moleskin weekly pocket notebook. 

Asset Inventory: Do you have yours?

The year is hardly a month old and we have people racing around as if their hair is on fire, demanding to know if the GLibc vulnerability CVE-2015-0235 (aka GHOST) [1] affects them. It’s a reasonable certainty that this won’t be the only time this year someone will be hammering on your door* wanting answers. And they want them now. https://isc.sans.edu/forums/diary/Asset+Inventory+Do+you+have+yours/19265/

An Argument for Moving Your SSH Port off 22

Whether or not one should move their SSH off port 22 is a hot discussion topic in security circles. The prevailing (and correct) belief is that changing the SSH port is a security by obscurity measure, because any attacker worth their weight in salt can just run a full port scan and find your SSH port. https://bsamuels.net/2015/01/04/argument-for-moving-ssh-off-port-22.html